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New Ways of Making Babies: Egg Donation (Medical Ethics), by Cynthia B. Cohen, National Advisory Board on Ethics in Reproduction

New Ways of Making Babies: The Case of Egg Donation (Medical Ethics Series)

by Cynthia B. Cohen (Editor), National Advisory Board on Ethics in Reproduction

Purchase at:  Amazon.com 

Format: Hardcover, 1st ed., 332pp. 
ISBN: 0253330580
Publisher: Indiana University Press 
Pub. Date: January 1996

Description from Amazon.com

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Description from BarnesandNoble.com

Annotation

The book contains no figures.

From the Publisher

In this book, leading scholars investigate the difficult ethical, legal, and policy issues that surround egg donation and the new reproductive technologies as a whole. Of special interest are feminist inquiries into perceptions of women involved in egg donation; the effects of race, ethnicity, and socio-economic status on the uses of such technologies; and moral and theological questions about whether third-party gamete donation should be used at all. In addition, the book describes procedures at four egg-donation centers in the United States, including private for-profit and university-based non-profit programs, and presents a new set of guidelines from the National Advisory Board on Ethics in Reproduction (NABER), a panel in the private sector with members from the fields of ethics, theology, law, medicine, genetics, and public policy.

From the Critics

From Doody Review Services

Reviewer: Diane M. Kondratowicz, MA, AM, AM (Loyola University Medical Center) Description: Focusing upon our increasing reproductive capabilities, this edited work offers a collection of essays written by noted scholars in the fields of reproductive medicine, biomedical ethics, law, and public policy. Purpose: Developed by the National Advisory Board on Ethics in Reproduction (NABER), this volume is intended to identify and recommend ways to resolve many of the troublesome issues raised by reproductive technologies in general and oocyte donation in particular. Audience: This work is intended for a wide and varied audience, including, as the editor indicates, healthcare practitioners in reproductive medicine, patients, state and federal policymakers, and interested lay persons. The book would also lend itself well to academic instruction. Features: Consisting of 18 chapters, this book is divided into three sections, each of which explores an important aspect of oocyte donation. Section I discusses the rationales underlying the established policies and procedures at four distinctive fertility programs within the United States. Consisting of 10 essays, Section II explores the many troublesome ethical, legal, policy, and economic aspects of oocyte donation. Divided into four parts, Section III reports on the current practice of this intervention and offers the recommendations of NABER. Assessment: This book provides readers with an insightful overview of the practice of oocyte donation, the broader issues raised by this innovative yet problematic technology and, given the recommendations of NABER, how theseissues might be resolved. Given the similarities between this and other fertility interventions currently practiced, this work will likely prompt renewed critical reflection and dialogue about our increasing reproductive capacities. Well written, structured, researched, and thought-provoking, this book makes a timely, important, and worthwhile contribution to the growing body of reproductive technology scholarship.

From Diane M. Kondratowicz

Focusing upon our increasing reproductive capabilities, this edited work offers a collection of essays written by noted scholars in the fields of reproductive medicine, biomedical ethics, law, and public policy. Developed by the National Advisory Board on Ethics in Reproduction (NABER), this volume is intended to identify and recommend ways to resolve many of the troublesome issues raised by reproductive technologies in general and oocyte donation in particular. This work is intended for a wide and varied audience, including, as the editor indicates, healthcare practitioners in reproductive medicine, patients, state and federal policymakers, and interested lay persons. The book would also lend itself well to academic instruction. Consisting of 18 chapters, this book is divided into three sections, each of which explores an important aspect of oocyte donation. Section I discusses the rationales underlying the established policies and procedures at four distinctive fertility programs within the United States. Consisting of 10 essays, Section II explores the many troublesome ethical, legal, policy, and economic aspects of oocyte donation. Divided into four parts, Section III reports on the current practice of this intervention and offers the recommendations of NABER. This book provides readers with an insightful overview of the practice of oocyte donation, the broader issues raised by this innovative yet problematic technology and, given the recommendations of NABER, how these issues might be resolved. Given the similarities between this and other fertility interventions currently practiced, this work will likely prompt renewed critical reflection and dialogue about our increasingreproductive capacities. Well written, structured, researched, and thought-provoking, this book makes a timely, important, and worthwhile contribution to the growing body of reproductive technology scholarship.

From Booknews

Discusses ethical, legal, and policy issues surrounding egg donation and new reproductive technologies, describes procedures at four egg- donation centers in the US, and presents a report and recommendations on oocyte donation by the National Advisory Board on Ethics in Reproduction. Topics include moral concerns about institutionalized gamete donation, genetic screening of donations, funding new reproductive technologies, and the effects of race, ethnicity, and socioeconomic status on infertility and its treatment. Annotation c. by Book News, Inc., Portland, Or.

Table of Contents

Acknowledgments

Introduction

1 Donor Oocyte Program at University of Washington Medical Center, Seattle, Washington   3

2 Oocyte Donation Program at Montefiore Medical Center, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York   15

3 Oocyte Donation Service at IVF America-Boston, Waltham, Massachusetts   29

4 Oocyte Donation Program at Huntington Reproductive Center: Quality Control Issues, Pasadena, California   35

5 New Reproductive Technologies and the Family   51

6 Moral Concerns about Institutionalized Gamete Donation   70

7 Parents Anonymous   88

8 What Is Wrong with Commodification?   106

9 Genetic Screening in Oocyte Donation: Ethical and Legal Aspects   122

10 Toward a Feminist Perspective on Gamete Donation and Reception Policies   138

11 Private and Public Policy Alternatives in Oocyte Donation   156

12 Legal Uncertainties in Human Egg Donation   175

13 The Differential Effects of Race, Ethnicity, and Socioeconomic Status on Infertility and Its Treatment: Ethical and Policy Issues for Oocyte Donation   188

14 Funding New Reproductive Technologies: Should They Be Included in Health Insurance Benefit Packages?   213

Ethical Questions Raised by Oocyte Donation and Values Informing This Report   237

Ethical and Policy Issues Related to Oocyte Recipients in the Clinical Setting   248

Ethical and Policy Issues Related to Oocyte Donors in the Clinical Setting   270

Public Policy and the Use of Oocyte Donation   293

Contributors   321 

Index   325
 


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